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What we can learn from the royal parents


May 17, 2018

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With a royal wedding coming up this month and a royal baby making his debut last month, I feel I can’t let another week go by without talking about the glory that is the British monarchy.

When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge stepped out of the hospital two weeks ago with their newborn son, a collective gasp sounded through the world of mothers who don’t live in palaces. We all, I’m almost certain, had the same response: No way.

No way could Kate look that good and rested and happy and perfect after delivering an 8-pound human into the world. Perhaps my favorite response of the day was this tweet with the photo of the couple leaving the hospital with their new baby: "Let's keep this real for the moms. The Duchess is wearing a diaper."

That really helped put things back in perspective for me and assuaged some of my royal family jealousies.

But it's also true: Kate Middleton is still a mom going through all the regular mom things we all go through. Granted, she also has an entourage, a private jet and what could only be described as the jackpot of all genetics, but she’s still a mom. And while we can all ooh and aah over her clothes and her heels and her general ability to look amazing while being a mom, I also admire her for what seems to be some pretty solid parenting skills.

A recent article on Today.com pointed out that both Kate and Prince William often exhibit stellar parenting in public by always getting down on their children’s level when speaking to them. I’ve seen this time and time again in royal photos. Kate, often in sky-high heels, will crouch down so she is eye level with young Prince George. William, likewise, will often crouch or bend so he’s face to face with his children.

I love this example because getting down on your child’s level is one of the first and most important things we can do when trying to connect with them. Often, we scold from on high rather than look our child in the eye, touch their shoulder and reassure them that we care, that we’re listening and that we are in this together.

I often think I am too busy to stop and crouch down to talk with my child. Instead, I talk down to her while doing other tasks. I may never look like Kate Middleton after birthing a baby (or ever, for that matter), but I can definitely take a page from her parenting book and physically position myself in a way that shows just how important my child's words and feelings are to me.

So, to the royal couple, I say congrats on all the babies and the beauty and general mind-blowing awesomeness. But I also say well done on showing your child that despite all the paparazzi and responsibilities of your position, you can take a few minutes to be one-on-one, eye-to-eye with the most important people in your life.

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