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Chyann Rose Hoyle: Little lady, big voice


May 03, 2016

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    Chyann Rose Hoyle is a sophomore at Southeast Bulloch High School. She is on the golf team, the math team and is a member of the Beta Club. She’s also heavily involved with 4-H and her church, Brooklet United Methodist. 
    Oh, and one more thing: She’s kind of a big deal. 
    Not many 16-year-olds earn the chance to sing at huge music festivals, open for Colt Ford or perform an original song for Jennifer Nettles — and in Nashville, to boot. 
    Chyann Rose Hoyle grew up listening to classic rock and country music. By the time she was in elementary school, she was already performing in church and talent shows. 
    “I started taking voice lessons first,” Hoyle said. Soon, she wanted to play an instrument, too. Her mother plays the piano, but although she tried to teach Chyann Rose early on, it wasn’t the right instrument for her. 
    “Current country music stars play guitars,” explained Hoyle, “so I thought it would be a good fit.” 
    Her first instrument was a toy Hannah Montana guitar, but when her talent and interest outgrew the model, she moved on to an Ibanez, to “see if [she] really did like it.” 
    She did, of course, and these days, she’s playing a Luna. Hoyle has built a career for herself out of the music she loves, performing everything from Tina Turner to Reba McEntire and Bobbie Gentry, from “Me & Bobby McGee” to “The House of the Rising Sun.” 
    She began writing original music about a year ago, too, and already has two songs under her belt: “Chasing That Dream” and “Georgia Girl,” which is “more toward the country side of things,” she said. 
    The song features such pastimes as “drinking sweet tea, watching football and praying, because I’m big into church,” Hoyle said. 
    “Georgia Girl” is also the song Chyann Rose performed for Jennifer Nettles, another Georgia girl with a mean set of pipes, whom Hoyle admires greatly. Their meeting was a highlight in Chyann Rose’s career as a musician, which continues to flourish. 
    Recently, Chyann Rose secured a coveted spot at the Suwannee River Jam in Orlando, Florida, a gig she went through two auditions to earn. 
    “I’m so excited, not just for my 20 minutes on stage,” said Hoyle before the weekend performance, “but also for the unofficial music circles. I’ve never gotten to do anything like that before, and it will be a new opportunity to meet people.”
    Headliners at the Suwannee River Jam included Lynyrd Skynyrd, Big & Rich, Kellie Pickler, and John Michael Montgomery, among others. Chyann Rose planned to play Reba’s “Fancy,” Tina Turner’s "Proud Mary" and an original song. 
    A true professional at 16, Hoyle always prepares set lists, and makes sure to visit venues before each show, to “get a feel for the vibe.” She’s also adaptable: on performance days, if she encounters an audience she thinks is “hardcore country or classic rock,” Hoyle will “maybe skip some songs on [her] set list” in order to play to the crowd. 
    To flesh out her sound, Hoyle likes to add at least one other guitar to her acts. Currently, she and her family are working on putting together a full-time band. 
    “I’ve been playing with so many different people,” Hoyle said, “but never one person for any length of time. Sometimes it’s just on-the-spot, and that can be a little difficult.”
    Juggling school, extracurricular activities, and a performance art career can also be challenging. There are a lot of late nights involved in the live music scene, too, and Chyann Rose said it can be taxing to stay up late on school nights, when she has to get up so early the next day. 
    “Not to mention homework,” she lamented. “That’s the worst of it, but even that’s not too terrible.”
    And that’s about as close to complaining as Chyann Rose gets. Where local renown might lead some young artists to grow ostentatious, Hoyle remains amiable and modest. She clearly loves what she is doing, and feels lucky to be doing it. 
    She is also sure to acknowledge where she came from, and those who have helped her along the way.
    She is most grateful to her parents, who, she said, “have put in a lot of the work.” 
    “They have backed me up and pushed me to pursue this career, and they are a lot of the reason for where I am today.”
    Hoyle’s mother acts as her booking agent, and her father, who helps her set up before shows, has also taught her some of the tricks of her trade. 
    “At first I let them do everything,” Chyann Rose said, “but then I figured I need to learn to do it for myself.” Her father, who is self-taught, has since shown her how to use her own sound equipment. 
    Unsurprisingly, Chyann Rose has big plans for her future. She wants to attend UGA, where she intends to pursue a degree in pharmacy. “I’ve always been big into math and science, and this past year, I took chemistry and really liked it,” she said. “Pharmacy is a really good mix of math and chemistry.”
    She’ll be hanging on to her performance career, too, saying, “Once I graduate, I want to get a job — maybe in Nashville — so I can still play.” 
    It doesn’t hurt that most pharmacy jobs boast three-day workweeks, Chyann Rose added. “That will give me the flexibility to keep playing.”
    For now, the Suwannee River Jam isn’t Hoyle’s only cause for celebration. She has been nominated for the Georgia Country Awards two years running, and this year, she was nominated for the Georgia Music Awards as well. She is a contender in the Youth Country/Rock category — which is perfect for Hoyle, as she straddles both genres, seeing herself as “a country artist with a lot of soul and blues that fits the classic rock stuff, too.” 
    “It would be really big for me” Hoyle said of the possibility of winning, “because even though I’ve been nominated before, it would be the first thing I’ve won as an artist.” 
    You can vote for Chyann Rose toward victory at http://awardshownow.com/gamusicawards/. Scroll down to click “Vote.”

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